Hogarth Flyover

The Hogarth Flyover is more than just a bridge carrying traffic — it's a metaphor for the whole of British transport planning in the late 20th century.

It was constructed in the early 1970s as a temporary solution to the traffic problems at the Hogarth Roundabout, which was due to be rebuilt in the near future as part of the Ringway plans. It was quickly put together with a cheap steel frame and was designed to last no more than a few years.

As you've probably guessed by now, that temporary flyover is still there. It's been in situ for more than 30 years and there's no intention to replace it. In fact, since these pictures were taken, it's undergone a major refurbishment project, with a largely new deck, surface and parapets, ensuring its survival and confirming that it's now a permanent fixture. It's make-do-and-mend on an epic scale.

A plan of the Hogarth Roundabout and Flyover. Click to enlarge
A plan of the Hogarth Roundabout and Flyover. Click to enlarge
Routes

What's new

Sorry, wrong number

Road numbering is a system with clear rules. What happens when the people responsible for numbering roads don't follow them?

We need to talk about Wisley

National Highways are spending a third of a billion pounds rebuilding one of the most congested junctions on the M25. Is it money well spent?

Oxford's Ground Zero

Oxford's Zero Emission Zone is just a trial, but transport policy in Oxford has become the catalyst for pitched battles and drawn in protestors from across the UK. What's happening to this genteel university town?

Share this page

Have you seen...

Aust to Beachley

Today two motorways cross the Severn near Chepstow. But as recently as 1965, the only crossing was a ferry that carried six cars at a time, from Aust to Beachley.

About this page

Published

Last updated