A66(M)

The A66(M) is a tiny little spur from the A1(M) to connect it to Darlington, which disappointingly ends on a single-carriageway road. Its full name is the Blackwell Spur.

It's quite odd that it was given its own number as it doesn't last much longer than a mile, and there are many other little spurs on the motorway network just like this one that don't have their own number and aren't considered motorways in their own right.

This road is actually a link from the new A1 (or rather A1(M)) to the old A1: the road's original course is now the unclassified road to Barton, and the A66 onwards towards Darlington is also part of the original Great North Road.

Start

Cleasby

End

Stapleton

Passes

None

Connects to
Length

1 mile

Click a section name to see its full details, or click a map symbol on the right to see all motorways opened in that year.

Completed Name Start End
Blackwell Spur A1(M) J57 Blackwell Spur Blackwell Chronology map for 1965

Exit list

Symbols and conventions are explained in the key to exit lists. You can click any junction to see its full details.

Junction   Westbound               Eastbound  
A1(M) J57
0/0 km
The SOUTH
Scotch Corner
A1(M) Link
A1(M) WEST

A1(M) N/A
LanesLanesLanesLanes LanesLanesLanesLanes
1 mile, 2 lanes 1 mile, 2 lanes
3/9 km N/A
A66
EAST
Darlington
A66
Stapleton
Barton
LanesLanesLanesLanes Signs LanesLanesLanesLanes Signs
Routes

Picture credits

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